Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary
Benchmark 5
Describe uses of materials taken from the Earth.

Benchmark Clarification

Materials taken from the Earth are used in our daily lives:

  • oil into gasoline
  • oil into plastics
  • sand into glass
  • metallic ores into metal
  • gravel into concrete and asphalt
  • coal burned for electricity
  • uranium for nuclear power
  • water for drinking, cleaning, and cooling

Students will:

  • Describe some of the uses of materials taken from the Earth

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary/Benchmark 5
Key Concept

  • transportation
  • building materials
  • energy
  • water

See (SCI.V.2.E.3).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary/Benchmark 5
Real World Context
Examples of uses of Earth materials:

  • gravel into concrete for walls
  • gypsum into drywall
  • sand into glass for windows
  • road salt
  • ores into metal for chairs
  • oil into gasoline for cars
  • coal burned to produce electricity
  • water for hydroelectric power

Samples of manufactured materials:

  • concrete
  • drywall
  • asphalt
  • iron
  • steel

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary/Benchmark 5
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How are materials taken from the Earth used?

Focus Question: How do people use materials from the Earth?

The teacher will pose the focus question and will facilitate the discussion. The teacher will place students in small groups and give each group a pencil. The teacher will ask the students what materials were used to make this pencil. In small groups, students will discuss the parts of the pencil and what Earth materials were used to make it: wood, pencil lead, metal bands, eraser, paint. They will organize their information into a data table and label each column.

 

Parts of the Pencil

 

Wood

Lead

Eraser

Paint

Metal Band

Earth Materials

Maple Trees

Graphite

Rubber Tree Sap

Petroleum

Aluminum Ore

 

Carbon

 

Oil

 

As a whole group, discuss what Earth materials were used to make the pencil and address any misconceptions. List some misconceptions that students might have like Earth materials are non-renewable natural resources that come from the geosphere, such as aluminum ore, petroleum, etc. Maple trees and rubber trees are renewable natural resources that are part of the biosphere. Earth materials are listed in Benchmark Clarification.

Each student will choose an object listed in the Real-World Context and research the Earth materials used to make the object.

Students will present their findings to the class in a speech with a visual aid.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.1).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1E.2), (SCI.II.1.E.4).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary/Benchmark 5
Assessment Example

Students will select five objects found around school. (A bit of guidance will be needed here given that so many everyday objects are combinations of several materials (ex. brass, most clothing, wood. A teacher provided list would allow students to choose from appropriate objects.) Each student will create a booklet that illustrates each object and lists the Earth materials that were used to make the object.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Completeness of illustrations

Illustrates fewer than three objects found around the school.

Illustrates three or four objects found around the school.

Illustrates five objects found around the school.

Illustrates more than five objects found around the school.

Completeness of lists of Earth materials

Creates a list that includes an Earth material for fewer than three objects found around the school.

Creates a list that includes an Earth material for three or four objects found around the school.

Creates a list that includes an Earth material for each of the five objects found around the school.

Creates a list that includes an Earth material for more than five objects found around the school.

Quality of construction

Includes no table of contents, two covers, no title, and no cover design.

Includes table of contents, two covers, title, and no cover design.

Includes table of contents, two covers with binding, and a basic cover design.

Includes table of contents, two covers with binding, and a unique cover design.

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Elementary/Benchmark 5
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.V.1.E.5.html

General Pencil Company.
http://www.generalpencil.com/

Cumberland Pencil Company.
http://www.pencils.co.uk/

Coal Education: educational resources, images, and lesson plans sponsored by the Kentucky Coal Council.
http://www.coaleducation.org/

Suzuki, David. Nature in the Home. Stoddard Kids, 1996.