Science
Strand V
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Earth and Space Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand V
Content Standard 1
All students will describe the EarthÕs surface; describe and explain how the EarthÕs features change over time; and analyze effects of technology on the EarthÕs surface and resources. (Geosphere)

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1
Middle School

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School
Benchmark 1
Describe and identify surface features using maps.

Benchmark Clarification

Maps are just one of the tools that scientists use to identify surface features of the Earth. Depending on the type of map, information given in the mapÕs key can be used to describe the EarthÕs surface features.

Students will:

  • Interpret different kinds of maps to identify local and regional landforms
  • Interpret maps of the continents and maps of the ocean floor to identify global landforms, such as plateaus, mountains, plains, etc.

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School/Benchmark 1
Key Concept
Landforms:

  • plains
  • deserts
  • plateaus
  • basins
  • Great Lakes
  • rivers
  • Continental Divide
  • mountains
  • mountain ranges
  • valleys

Tools:

  • raised relief maps:
  • topographic maps

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School/Benchmark 1
Real World Context
Maps showing local and regional surface features:

  • Great Lakes
  • local topography

Maps showing global surface features:

  • continents
  • ocean floors

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School/Benchmark 1
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: What is the EarthÕs surface like?

Focus Question: How do different types of maps help us to identify surface features of the Earth?

Students will write their personal definitions of Ōsurface features.Ķ Students will work together to develop one common definition. The teacher should be sure that the final definition includes both features below sea level/ocean floor features and above sea level/continental features

Once a common definition of surface features is complete, the class could brainstorm specific surface features and their locations in the world.

Working in small groups, students will use a variety of maps (i.e., satellite imaging, topographical, physical and relief to compare and contrast designated areas across the U.S. and the world. Each small group will create a model of a specific area/region showing features from various maps that may include plains, deserts, plateaus, basins, the Great Lakes, the Continental Divide, a mountain range, and a mountain chain. Each group of students will present their information to the class. In their presentations, students will describe in detail the characteristics of the surface features and compare their model to the maps they used. After their presentations, students will identify different surface features from stations of topographical maps.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1MS.1), (SCI.I.1.MS.4), (SCI.I.1.MS.5).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1MS.1), (SCI.II.1.MS.3), (SCI.II.1.MS.5).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School/Benchmark 1
Assessment Example

Pairs of students will use topographical and ocean floor maps to create a model of a specific geographical area focusing on existing surface features and the surrounding area. They will present their models to the class. They will explain the models and their correlation to the map (See Instructional Example).

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Accuracy of model

Transfers few map features to a model correctly.

Transfers some map features to a model correctly.

Transfers many map features to a model correctly.

Transfers all map features to a model correctly.

Correctness of labels

Model illustrates at least two correctly labeled surface features.

Model illustrates at least four correctly labeled surface features.

Model illustrates at least five correctly labeled surface features.

Model illustrates six or more correctly labeled surface features.

Presentation of model

Presents information that explains the correlation between at least two surface features

Presents information that explains the correlation between at least four surface features.

Presents information that explains the correlation between at least five surface features.

Presents information that explains the correlation between six or more surface features.

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 1/Middle School/Benchmark 1
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.V.1.MS.1.html

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/maps/map_links.html#mag

http://topozone.com/find.asp

http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/maps/

USGS Topographic Maps Illustrating Physiographic Features: ŌUse this index to select the names and locations of topographic maps that illustrate the particular physical feature of interest, such asthose resulting from glaciation, karst, tectonics, orvolcanism. The index is also organized by state.Ķ
http://rockyweb.cr.usgs.gov/public/outreach/featureindex.html

Map Finder: find 7.5 minute topographic maps by entering zip code, city, or clicking a state image map.
http://edcwww.cr.usgs.gov/Webglis/glisbin/finder_main.pl?dataset_name=MAPS_LARGE

Landforms on Topographic Maps: find examples of landforms depicted on topographic maps inclucing Geologic Structures, Igneous Activity, Mass Movement, Streams, Underground Water, Glaciers, Wind, Waves and Currents.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/slaymaker/Geol10L/landforms.htm

Landform Identification: Cerritos College offers a series of tutorials using topographic maps, photos, and aerial imagery to identify glacial, coastal, volcanic, wind, fluvial, karst, tectonic, and mass wasting landforms. In some cases, exercises are present for students to test their skills in identifying landforms.
http://www2.cerritos.edu/earth-science/tutor/landform_identification.htm

Topographic Map Examples: entire quads depicting landforms and cultural features. File sizes are large.
http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/slaymaker/Geol10L/wholemaps.htm

Color Landform Atlas of the U.S. offers shaded relief maps (large file size), county maps, black and white maps, satellite image, 1895 maps (Big: 1.92 Mb), and postscript file maps for printing of all 50 states.
http://fermi.jhuapl.edu/states/states.html

Seafloor and Land Elevation Map: spectacular 2 x 2 minute map of earth bathymetry/topography.
http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/image/2minsurface/

Tapestry of Time and Terrain: USGS map merging topographic and geologic maps, click on maps for further information on a particular location's physiographic province and geologic age.
http://tapestry.usgs.gov/

Braus, Judy. Geology: The Active Earth. RANGER RICKÕS NATURESCOPE SERIES. National Wildlife Federation, 1995.

Deserts/Volcanoes. Bill Nye Video. Disney Educational. (800/295-5010).

Finding Yours Bearings. AIMS.
http://wwws.aimsedu.org/aimscatalog/default.tpl

Through The Eyes of Explorers. AIMS.
http://wwws.aimsedu.org/aimscatalog/default.tpl

Wetlands, Rivers & Streams. Bill Nye Video. Disney Educational. (800/295-5010).