Science
Strand III
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Life Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand III
Content Standard 1
All students will apply an understanding of cells to the functioning of multi-cellular organisms; and explain how cells grow, develop, and reproduce. (Cells)

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1
High School

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School
Benchmark 2
Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions.

Benchmark Clarification

A cell is an integration of organelles, each performing a specific role that allows the cell to sustain life. Some specific tasks include: reproduction, transport, and photosynthesis.

Students will:

  • Compare and contrast cells with different functions
  • Determine how cells are specialized to perform specific tasks by relating cell structure to cell function
  • Observe and explain differences among plant, animal, and bacterial cells

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School/Benchmark 2
Key Concept
Classifications of organisms by cell type:

  • plant
  • animal
  • bacteria
  • selected cells

See Photosynthesis (SCI.III.2.MS.3).

See Reproduction (SCI.III.3.HS.2).

Selected specialized plant and animal cells:

  • red blood cells
  • white blood cells
  • muscle cells
  • nerve cells
  • root cells
  • leaf cells
  • stem cells

Cell parts used for classification:

  • organelle
  • nucleus
  • cell wall
  • cell membrane

Specialized functions:

  • reproduction
  • photosynthesis
  • transport

Cell shape

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School/Benchmark 2
Real World Context
Specialized plant and animal cells:

  • red blood cells
  • white blood cells
  • muscle cells
  • nerve cells
  • root cells
  • leaf cells
  • stem cells
  • bacteria

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School/Benchmark 2
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How are selected cells specialized to carry out particular life functions?

Focus Question: How does the physical appearance of a cell indicate the possible function of the cell?

The teacher will have students use pictures of different kinds of specialized cells from books, internet sources, or prepared slides to observe structural differences. Each student will write an explanation of how the overall structure of a cell relates to its function (e.g., a nerve cell.) Students should identify any specific organelles present and relate these organelles to the function of the cell (e.g., chloroplast with photosynthesis in a plant).

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.HS.1), (SCI.I.1.HS.4).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.HS.1), (SCI.II.1.HS.2), (SCI.II.1.HS.3).

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School/Benchmark 2
Assessment Example

Each student will design, construct, and label a cell with six or more different structures. Based on the structures used, each student will write a paragraph describing what the cell is able to do.

(Extension: Have students design a new kind of cell whose primary function is movement.)

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Construction of cell model

Constructs a model with fewer than three accurate labels and structures.

Constructs a model with three to five accurate labels and structures.

Constructs a model with six accurate labels and structures.

Constructs a model with more than six accurate labels and structures.

Explanation of relationship

Explains the relationship between fewer than three structures and the cell’s function.

Explains the relationship between three to five structures and the cell’s function.

Explains the relationship between six structures and the cell’s function.

Explains the relationship between more than six structures and the cell’s function.

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 1/High School/Benchmark 2
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.III.1.HS.2.html

Cell pictures.
http://cellsalive.com/

Respiration.
http://www.purchon.com/biology/respire.htm