Science
Strand III
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Life Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand III
Content Standard 2
All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things; compare and contrast differences in the life cycles of living things; investigate and explain how living things obtain and use energy; and analyze how parts of living things are adapted to carry out specific functions. (Organization of Living Things)

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2
High School

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School
Benchmark 1
Classify major groups of organisms to the kingdom level.

Benchmark Clarification

Classifications are not etched in stone. They change over time. Many classification systems can be used to organize living things into groups with similar characteristics.

Students will:

  • Identify and describe the characteristics used to place organisms into each kingdom
  • Discuss the dynamic (changeable) nature of our classification system

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 1
Key Concept
Kingdom categories:

  • Protista
  • Fungi
  • Monera
  • Animalia
  • Plantae

Characteristics for classification:

  • cell wall
  • cell membrane
  • organelle
  • single-celled
  • multi-celled

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 1
Real World Context
Common local representatives of each of the five major kingdoms:

  • paramecium
  • yeast
  • mushroom
  • bacteria
  • frog
  • geranium

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 1
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How are organisms classified to the kingdom level?

Focus Question: What specific characteristics are used to divide organisms into the major kingdoms?

Using preserved and live organisms and a list of characteristics associated with the major kingdoms, small groups of students will sort the organisms into their appropriate kingdom groups. As a group, students will write a summary of the problems encountered with placing organisms into groups based solely on visible, physical characteristics. As a group, students will generate a list of ideas on other possible ways to classify organisms.

Extension: Students could make taxonomic keys for their specimens.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.HS.4), (SCI.I.1.HS.5).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.HS.1), (SCI.II.1.HS.2).

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 1
Assessment Example

The teacher will give each student a set of ten or more organisms (at least one from each kingdom). Each student will classify the organisms into the appropriate kingdom. The student will give orally his or her reasons for the placement of each organism into its kingdom.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Correctness of classification

Places six or fewer organisms in the correct kingdom.

Places seven to eight organisms in the correct kingdom.

Places nine organisms in the correct kingdom.

Places more than nine organisms in the correct kingdom.

Accuracy of explanation

Explains accurately the reason(s) for placing six or fewer organisms into their proper kingdoms.

Explains accurately the reason(s) for placing seven or eight organisms into their proper kingdoms.

Explains accurately the reason(s) for placing nine organisms into their proper kingdoms.

Explains accurately the reason(s) for placing more than nine organisms into their proper kingdoms.

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 1
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.III.2.HS.1.html

Family tree.
http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/

Taxonomy.
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/help/taxaform.html