Science
Strand III
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Life Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand III
Content Standard 2
All students will use classification systems to describe groups of living things; compare and contrast differences in the life cycles of living things; investigate and explain how living things obtain and use energy; and analyze how parts of living things are adapted to carry out specific functions. (Organization of Living Things)

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2
High School

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School
Benchmark 4
Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment.

Benchmark Clarification

An organism’s external environment may be changed by weather, global warming, earthquakes, floods, etc., but an organism’s internal environment is stable. An organism’s stability is maintained by feedback within the different systems.

Students will:

  • Describe how an organism’s internal environment responds to change
  • Explain why an organism’s internal environment is stable
  • Explain homeostasis
  • Describe the human immune system’s response to invading organisms

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 4
Key Concept
Related systems/cells/chemicals:

  • excretory system
  • endocrine system
  • circulatory system
  • hormones
  • immune response
  • white blood cell
  • bacteria
  • virus

Factors/mechanisms under control:

  • temperature
  • disease/infection
  • homeostasis

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 4
Real World Context
Mechanisms for maintaining internal stability:

  • body temperature
  • disease control

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 4
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How do living things maintain a stable internal environment?

Focus Question: What steps must be taken to maintain a stable system?

Working in groups without any verbal communication, students should maintain a constant temperature of a beaker filled with hot water. Using two beakers of water, one large and one small, a thermometer, cold water, and a heat source, students should maintain the large beaker of water at approximately 50oC. Students then should describe the process their group used to maintain the constant temperature. (If available, use probes and graphing programs; this will give students more accurate feedback.)

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.HS.1), (SCI.I.1.HS.2).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.HS.1).

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 4
Assessment Example

The teacher will explain the Homeostasis Feedback Loop Model. Each student will be given a human homeostatic condition (e.g., temperature, sugar level, breathing, etc.). The student will draw and label a diagram of a feedback loop for the assigned condition. Each student will present an oral explanation of the steps in his or her feedback loop diagram.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Accuracy of diagram

Draws and labels a diagram with more than two errors.

Draws and labels a diagram with one or two errors.

Draws and labels a diagram of a feedback loop that will function.

Draws and labels a diagram with an explanation of each stage.

Correctness of order

Connects the events with more than one error.

Connects the events with one error.

Connects the events in a complete and accurate manner.

Connects the events in a complete and accurate manner with additional information.

 

Science/Strand III/Content Standard 2/High School/Benchmark 4
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.III.2.HS.4.html

Homeostasis.
http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=118195

Homeostasis with feedback loop.
http://bioserve.latrobe.edu.au/vcebiol/cat1/aos2/u3aos21.html