Biology 1 Benchmarks
[Constructing and Reflecting] [Life Science]
UNIT BENCHMARKS
What do you want students to:
know, do, be like?
SUGGESTED ASSESSMENTS
How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?
POSSIBLE RESOURCES
What possible instructional resources
could be used?
What topics should be taught?

Members of HFII Bio 1 teachers met to semesterize Bio 1 at Ford. Click here to view their topic sequence. . The junior high school science chairs will meet soon to begin to determine the Bio 1
sequence in the junior highs.

Cells: Labs & Activities

Multimedia:

Print Material:

Field Trips:

IRC Activities: Check calendar frequently for new events.


Units of Practice:
Each UOP, located on the Utica Learning Interchange (ULI), is developed by one of your colleagues, an experienced teacher, and exemplifies an approach to integrating technology into the teaching and learning process. Search the UOPs by Subject and Level or by Keyword.


Web Link

III.1.HS.1 Explain how multi-cellular organisms grow, based on how cells grow and reproduce. 1st semester

Students will use their knowledge of cell theory to:

  • Explain mitosis, meiosis, and differentiation and how they relate to growth in a multi-cellular organism
  • Explain that respiration provides energy for making cell components
  • Describe how the chemical composition of cells originates from outside the cell, such as the products of digested food, which are used as the building blocks by the cell to synthesize more complex chemicals
  • Show how growth of multi-cellular organisms is the result of an increase in the number of cells, not just a change in their size
III.1.HS.2 Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions. 1st semester

Students will:

  • Compare and contrast cells with different functions
  • Determine how cells are specialized to perform specific tasks by relating cell structure to cell function
  • Observe and explain differences among plant, animal, and bacterial cells
Living Things:
III.2.HS.1 Classify major groups of organisms to the kingdom level.
2nd semester

Students will: 5 or 6 (dichotomous key)?

  • Identify and describe the characteristics used to place organisms into each kingdom
  • Discuss the dynamic (changeable) nature of our classification system
  • Understand that classifications are not etched in stone. They change over time (limitations in science)
III.2.HS.2 Describe the life cycle of an organism associated with human disease. 2nd semester

NOTE: Check in your building and see if this is covered in your health class.

Students will:

  • Research the life cycle of a disease-causing organism
  • Diagram the stages of the life cycle for a human disease-causing organism
  • Write a short description of each stage in the organism’s life cycle
III.2.HS.3 Explain the process of food storage and food use in organisms. 1st semester

Students will:

  • Trace food energy from the Sun, by direct or indirect paths, to all organisms
  • Describe how food produced by photosynthesis is distributed to cells as a form of stored energy and then converted to a useful form of energy in a chemical reaction involving oxygen (aerobic respiration)
  • Describe how the energy in food can be stored by organisms and used for energy in the future
III.2.HS.4 Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment. 2nd semester

Students will:

  • Describe how an organism’s internal environment responds to change
  • Explain why an organism’s internal environment is stable
  • Explain homeostasis
  • Describe the human immune system’s response to invading organisms
III.2.HS.5 Describe technology used in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and explain its function in terms of human body processes. both semesters

NOTE: Check in your building and see if this is covered in your health class.

Students will:

  • Identify the types of technology used to maintain health in individuals
  • Identify the types of technology used to maintain health in a community
  • Assess how technology is used to improve the health of individuals
  • Analyze the body’s response to medical interventions such as organ transplants, medicines, and inoculations
Heredity:
III.3.HS.1 Explain how characteristics of living things are passed on from generation to generation.
1st semester

Students will:

  • Diagram how the gene pair in one parent will separate and make sex cells that will combine with a sex cell from the other parent to form offspring
  • Predict the characteristics of possible offspring, given the gene combinations of the parents
  • Trace a trait from generation to generation (e.g., sickle cell anemia)
III.3.HS.2 Describe how genetic material is passed from parent to young during sexual and asexual reproduction. 1st semester

Students will:

  • Compare and contrast the processes of meiosis and mitosis
  • Compare and contrast sexual reproduction and asexual reproduction
  • Explain how DNA replicates
  • Explain why sexual reproduction provides greater variation in individuals, and within a population, compared to asexual reproduction
III.3HS.3 Explain how new traits may arise in individuals through changes in genetic material (DNA).
1st semester

Students will:

  • Show how a mutation in a nucleotide sequence may show up as a change in the trait of the individual
  • Identify mutation-causing factors in the environment
  • Debate the positive and negative effects of human manipulation of the DNA
  • Show how a beneficial trait would become part of the genetic materials in members of a population
Evolution:
III.4.HS.1 Describe what biologists consider to be evidence for human evolutionary relationships to selected animal groups. 1st semester

Students will:

  • Analyze and interpret evidence supporting a progression from a common ancestry
  • List and discuss what biologists consider to be evidence that humans evolved from more primitive forms
III.4.HS.2 Explain how a new species or variety may originate through the evolutionary process of natural selection. 1st semester

Students will:

  • Describe how changes within the environment select for survival and reproduction of certain individuals
  • Predict how the selection for specific traits might result in the development of a new species
  • Relate natural selection to the development of new populations (e.g., a strain of bacteria becoming resistant)
  • Identify the differences between inherited and non-inherited traits
Ecosystems:
III.5.HS.1 Describe common ecological relationships between and among species and their environments.
2nd semester

Students will:

  • List biotic and abiotic factors in a given environment
  • Identify and describe the biotic and abiotic factors that impact and influence a specific population’s size
    • Describe possible interactions between two biotic and abiotic factors
III.5.HS.2 Explain how energy flows through familiar ecosystems.
2nd semester

Students will:

  • Construct the energy relationships in an ecosystem’s food web
  • Describe how only a fraction of the available energy is used for growth and incorporated in the plant or animal itself at each stage of the food web
  • Analyze how energy transformation and the cycling of matter in ecosystems are related
III.5.HS.3 Describe general factors regulating population size in ecosystems. 2nd semester

Students will:

  • Predict how specific changes within the environment may increase/decrease a population’s size
  • Analyze how specific human activities may affect population sizes
  • Identify the environmental (biotic or abiotic) factors that may affect the carrying capacity of a population
III.5.HS.4 Describe responses of an ecosystem to events that cause it to change. 2nd semester

Students will:

  • Diagram the process of slow changes over time in the environment (ecological succession)
  • Predict how an external force affects ecological succession
  • Explain the relationship between the stability of an ecosystem and its biodiversity (organisms can adapt, migrate, or die)
III.5.HS.5 Describe how carbon and soil nutrients cycle through selected ecosystems. 2nd semester

Students will:

  • Analyze the process of how plants take common nutrients and build organic compounds
  • Describe how plants and animals use organic compounds for growth, maintenance, and reproduction (include respiration and photosynthesis)
  • Illustrate how these compounds are broken down (decomposers) and cycled through the living and non-living parts of the environment
III.5.HS.6 Explain the effects of agriculture and urban development on selected ecosystems. 2nd semester

Students will:

  • Identify the specific impacts of agriculture, manufacturing, recreation, and urban development on ecosystems
  • Research how decisions that impact the environment are made by governments and businesses
  • Debate the value of protecting the environment vs. the economic impact of those decisions

Committee Members:

Glenn Charles, Wayne Hewitt, Lynda Jolliff, Dave Jones, Dave Verlinde

Last Revised: Tue, Jan 6, 2004