Science
Strand IV
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Physical Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand IV
Content Standard 2
All students will investigate, describe, and analyze ways in which matter changes; describe how living things and human technology change matter and transform energy; explain how visible changes in matter are related to atoms and molecules; and how changes in matter are related to changes in energy. (Changes in Matter)

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2
Elementary

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary
Benchmark 1
Describe common physical changes in matter: size, shape, melting, freezing (K-2); dissolving, evaporating (3-5).

Benchmark Clarification

Matter is made of the same original material even after a physical change such as melting (solid to liquid), freezing (liquid to solid), dissolving (solid in liquid), or evaporating (liquid to gas). See Water in three states, (SCI.V.2.E.1)

Students will:

  • Describe physical changes in substances and/or objects, including the change of size, shape, or state of matter (solid, liquid, gas)

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Key Concept
States of matter:

  • solid
  • liquid
  • gas

Changes in size and shape:

  • bending
  • tearing
  • breaking

Processes that cause changes of state:

  • heating
  • cooling

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Real World Context
Changes in size or shape of familiar objects:

  • making snowballs
  • breaking glass
  • crumbling cookies
  • making clay models
  • carving wood
  • breaking bones

Changes in state of water or other substances:

  • freezing of ice cream
  • freezing of ponds
  • melting wax or steel
  • puddles drying up

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: What are the common physical changes in matter?

Focus Question: What happens to matter when there is a physical change?

K-2 example:

  • Bring a snowball in for students to observe. Using picture or written form, students should record their observations of changes in the snowball in their journals. Discussion needs to follow as to the change being a physical change in the state of matter.
  • Take a piece of paper and crumple it. Discuss how the paper has not changed but the physical properties, size, and shape have.

3-5 example:

  • Use the past Science MEAP investigation using the sugar cubes dissolving activity.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.1), (SCI.I.1.E.2), (SCI.I.1.E.3), (SCI.I.1.E.4), (SCI.I.1.E.5), (SCI.I.1.E.6).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.E.1), (SCI.II.1.E.4).

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Assessment Example

The teacher will prepare the following models, either real or through pictures:

Items

Sample changes and processes

Whole cookie to cookie crumbs

Change in size, shape

Clay ball to clay sculpture

Change in size, shape

Ice cube to liquid water

Change in size, shape, melting — solid to liquid

Glass full of water to same size glass with little water

Change in size

Glass of water and powdered drink mix to dissolving glass of water with powder mixed in the water

Change in color

Students will describe the physical changes that have occurred and name the processes that caused the change.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Correctness of description

Incorrectly describes what happened.

Correctly describes what happened.

Correctly describes what happened.

Correctly describes what happened.

Accuracy of identification

Incorrectly identifies the physical change, and does not state that the changed object is made of the same material as the original object.

Incorrectly identifies the physical change, and does not state that the changed object is made of the same material as the original object.

Correctly identifies the physical change, but does not state that the changed object is made of the same material as the original object.

Correctly identifies the physical change, and states that the changed object is made of the same material as the original object.

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.IV.2.E.1.html

“Brain Pop — States of Matter.” MASER PROJECT.
http://www.svsu.edu/mathsci-center/Maser%20Science/MASER.html

http://www.Brainpop.com/

Hewitt, Sally. Solid, Liquid or Gas? Children’s Press, 1997.