Science
Strand IV
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Physical Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand IV
Content Standard 4
All students will describe sounds and sound waves; explain shadows, color, and other light phenomena; measure and describe vibrations and waves; and explain how waves and vibrations transfer energy. (Waves and Vibrations)

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4
Elementary

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary
Benchmark 3

Use prisms and filters with light sources to produce various colors of light.

Benchmark Clarification

Light energy is a form of electromagnetic radiation released by various sources such as the Sun, other stars, flames, and light bulbs. Light energy appears to be white, but actually white light is composed of different colors. These colors occur in a predictable pattern called a spectrum. The pattern of the spectrum is red, orange, yellow, blue, indigo, and violet. Prisms, water in a glass, and clouds can bend white light and separate it into the colors of the spectrum.

Students will:

  • Experiment with a variety of light sources, prisms, and filters to separate white light into the colors of the spectrum

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Key Concept
White light is composed of different colors.

Tools:

  • prism
  • filter
  • light source
  • colors of light

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Real World Context
Light from common sources:

  • Sun
  • stars
  • light bulb
  • colored lights
  • firefly
  • candle
  • flashlight
  • various prisms

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How do you use prisms and filters with light to produce color?

Focus Question: What colors are produced when manipulating a prism with light?

The teacher will invite a printer, photographer, or local theater lighting technician to share how light and color affect their jobs.

The teacher will hang a beveled glass object such as a crystal or sun catcher by the window.

Students will observe what happens when light energy passes through the glass object and will record their observations Students will share their observations with the class and name the specific colors they see.

In a demonstration, the teacher will place a clear pie plate containing water on the overhead. Students will write predictions of the colors they will see when the teacher turns on the light (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet).

The teacher will turn on the light and ask students to check their predictions.

Pairs of students will experiment with prisms and a light source to produce the colors of the spectrum.

Extension: Students will write a color poem or song about light including a minimum of three colors.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.1), (SCI.I.1.E.3), (SCI.I.1.E.4).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1E.2), (SCI.II.1.E.4), (SCI.II.1E.5).

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Assessment Example

Each student will use his or her knowledge of light to write a paragraph explaining why water appears to be shades of blue, why the sky looks blue, or why we see rainbows.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Correctness of Explanation

Provides incorrect explanation with no details.

Provides correct explanation with few details.

Provides correct explanation with some details.

Provides correct explanation with many details.

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.IV.4.E.3.html

“Basic Prism — Waves & Vibrations.” MASER PROJECT.
http://www.svsu.edu/mathsci-center/Maser%20Science/MASER.html

Gore, Gordon. Light & Color. EXPERIMENTING WITH…SERIES. Trifolium Books, 2001.

Nankivell, Sally. Science Experiments with Color. Watts, 2000.

Nankivell, Sally. Science Experiments with Light. Watts, 2000.

Tahta, Sophy. Why Is Night Dark? USBOURNE STARTING POINT SERIES. Usbourne, 1990.

http://www.Explorescience.com/activities/Activity_page.cfm?Activity1D51/