Science
Strand IV
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Physical Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand IV
Content Standard 4
All students will describe sounds and sound waves; explain shadows, color, and other light phenomena; measure and describe vibrations and waves; and explain how waves and vibrations transfer energy. (Waves and Vibrations)

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4
High School

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School
Benchmark 2
Explain how we see colors of objects.

Benchmark Clarification

The colors of objects depend on how light waves are reflected (bounce off), absorbed (taken in), transmitted (pass through), scattered (reflected in numerous directions), and/or emitted (produced).

Amplitude is defined as the measure of energy within a wave. With light it is a measure of brightness.

Students will:

  • Explain that colors differ as a result of wavelengths of light
  • Describe that brightness depends on amplitude

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School/Benchmark 2
Key Concept
Characteristics of light:

Colors of spectrum (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet)

Ways that objects interact with light:

  • emission
  • reflection
  • absorption
  • transmission
  • scattering

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School/Benchmark 2
Real World Context
Colored light-reflecting objects:

  • books
  • clothes
  • color photographs

Colored light-transmitting objects:

  • stained glass
  • cellophane

Colored light-emitting objects:

  • television
  • neon lights

Scattering of light by atmosphere

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School/Benchmark 2
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: How can we describe light?

Focus Question: How do we see colors of objects?

After a discussion of what produces colors of objects, students will perform a small group lab investigation. In groups, students will place various colored objects in a box and predict what color the objects will be when a color filter is placed in a hole on top of the box. Students then will put the color filter over the box, observe what they see, and record the color of the objects. After classroom discussion, each group will write an explanation of how they see colors of objects using the following terms: absorption, reflection, transmission, and scattering. Students also will explain the relationship between wavelength and color.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.HS.1), (SCI.I.1.HS.2), (SCI.I.1.HS.5).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.HS.1).

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School/Benchmark 2
Assessment Example

Each student will write an explanation of how we see the colors of objects.

The explanation will include the key terms absorption, reflection, transmission and scattering.

The explanation will include the relationship between wavelength and color.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Correctness of explanation -color of an object

Uses correctly one key term to explain how the color of an object is seen.

Uses correctly two key terms to explain how the color of an object is seen.

Uses correctly three key terms to explain how the color of an object is seen.

Uses correctly four key terms to explain how the color of an object is seen.

Correctness of explanation — relationship between wavelength and color

Explains that white light is made up of many wavelengths.

Explains that colors can be identified by wavelengths.

Explains that each color has a unique wavelength.

Explains the position of colors within the spectrum (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet) in terms of their wavelengths.

 

Science/Strand IV/Content Standard 4/High School/Benchmark 2
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.IV.4.HS.2.html

Electromagnetic Spectrum.
http://imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/ems/visible.html

Visible Electromagnetic Spectrum.
http://fusioned.gat.com/Teachers/Curriculum/Curriculum-HTML/T01-visible-light.html

Visible Light Rays.
http://imagers.gsfc.nasa.gov/ems/visible.html