Science
Strand V
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Earth and Space Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand V
Content Standard 2
All students will describe the characteristics of water and demonstrate where water is found on Earth; describe how water moves; and analyze the interaction of human activities with the hydrosphere. (Hydrosphere)

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2
Elementary

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary
Benchmark 1
Describe how water exists on Earth in three states.

Benchmark Clarification

Water is found on the Earth as a liquid, solid, and gas:

  • Liquid: visible, flowing, melting, dew
  • Solid: visible, hard, freezing, ice
  • Gas: invisible, water vapor, moisture, evaporation

Students will:

  • Describe water in its various states

Note: A BIG misconception (firmly embedded in college students) is that clouds or steam rising from a pan of boiling water is water vapor. Can students see oxygen, nitrogen, or unpolluted air? No. Teachers must stress that water vapor is invisible. If a student can “see” water then it is ONLY in the liquid or solid state.

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Key Concept
Liquid (K-2):

  • visible
  • flowing
  • melting
  • dew

Solid (K-2):

  • visible
  • hard
  • freezing
  • ice

Gas (3-5):

  • invisible
  • water vapor
  • moisture
  • evaporating

See (SCI.IV.2.E.1).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Real World Context

  • examples of water in each state, including dew, rain, snow, ice
  • evidence of moisture in the air such as “fog” on cold bathroom mirrors
  • examples of melting, freezing, and evaporating

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: Where is water found on Earth and what are its characteristics?

Focus Question: What are the different states of water on the Earth’s surface?

In the teacher-guided demonstration, the teacher will place soil or sand in a plastic container with a cover (clear rectangular works best). Using a scale, students will weigh the tightly sealed container and record their findings. The teacher will add ice to the container, seal it, and re-weigh the container. Students will record this data. The container should be moved to an observable place and slightly elevated at one end.

The teacher should pose the focus question and allow students to record a prediction. Using a table to record date and time, students should draw or describe their observations after the container is sealed for five days. The students will make several observations of the sealed container and record and draw (or describe) their observations. Students will participate in discussions around the focus question.

On the last day of the demonstration, the teacher will weigh the container. The students will compose written draw conclusions based on their observations and the class discussions in regard to the focus question. They will also include a comparison between their predictions and results of the demonstration.

Note: If the container is tightly sealed there should be little change in the weight of the container.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.1) (SCI.I.1.E.2), (SCI.I.1.E.4), (SCI.I.1.E.6)

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.E.4)

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Assessment Example

Students will use the data collected in the Instructional Example to answer the focus question: “What are the different states of water on the Earth’s surface?” Students will include the different states of water on Earth and the data collected in the demonstration to write a summary paragraph.

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Accuracy of description

Writes a description using key concepts that is an inaccurate connection to the collected data and table.

Writes a description that uses fewer than four key concepts connected to the collected data and table.

Writes a description that uses at least five key concepts connected to the collected data and table.

Writes a description that uses seven or more key concepts connected to the collected data and table.

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 2/Elementary/Benchmark 1
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.V.2.E.1.html

EPA Office of Water.
http://www.epa.gov/students/clean_water_basics.htm

Water Science for Schools: offers information on many aspects of water, along with pictures, data, maps, and an interactive center where you can give opinions and test your water knowledge.
http://www.epa.gov/students/clean_water_basics.htm

Cast, C. Vance. Where Does Water Come From? THE CLEVER CALVIN SERIES. Barron’s, 1992.

McKinney,Barbara. Drop Around The World. Dawn, 1998.