Science
Strand V
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Earth and Space Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand V
Content Standard 3
All students will investigate and describe what makes up weather and how it changes from day to day, from season to season, and over long periods of time; explain what causes different kinds of weather; and analyze the relationships between human activities and the atmosphere. (Atmosphere and Weather)

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3
Elementary

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary
Benchmark 2

Describe seasonal changes in Michigan’s weather.

Benchmark Clarification

Michigan’s weather changes with the seasons.

Changes in weather will include:

  • Temperature
  • Precipitation (rain, snow)
  • Number of hours of sunlight

Students will:

  • Compare and contrast seasonal changes in weather (e.g., fall, winter, spring, summer)
  • Describe the effects of seasonal changes on:
    • vegetation
    • human activities

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 2
Key Concept
Seasons and types of weather:

  • fall — cool nights and warm days, day length getting shorter
  • winter — snowy and cold, getting dark early in the evenings
  • spring — warmer days, often rainy with thunderstorms, day length getting longer
  • summer — warm or hot days and warm nights, daylight lasting until late in the evenings

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 2
Real World Context
Examples of visible seasonal changes in nature

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 2
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: What are the relationships between human activities and the atmosphere?

Focus Question: How do the temperature and precipitation for each season affect what we wear?

The teacher will ask students, “What are the four seasons?” Students might come up with the names of the seasons: spring, summer, fall, and winter. The teacher will ask students how they use their senses to know it is spring, summer, fall, or winter. The teacher will compile the students’ observations in a data table. The teacher will ask questions that will help students make connections between changes in temperatures and kinds of precipitation.

The teacher will ask students to talk about the temperature and precipitation for each season and discuss the type of clothing appropriate for each season. Students will add this information to the data table.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.1), (SCI.I.1.E.2), (SCI.I.1.E.5).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1.E.1), (SCI.II.1.E.4).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 2
Assessment Example

Students will draw a series of pictures in the order of the seasons. The pictures will show precipitation and people wearing appropriate clothing for each season. Students will compare and contrast their pictures with others in small groups (i.e., students will compare winter coats, hats, and mittens with summer shorts, t-shirts, and swimsuits).

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

Note: Precipitation will be perceived differently by different students. We are taught early on how “wet” it is in spring; while statistically, the most precipitation comes in the summer because warm air can “hold” more moisture. The driest season statistically also happens to be the snowiest, namely, the winter.

Criteria

Apprentice

Basic

Meets

Exceeds

Correctness of order

Incorrect order with no labels for seasons.

Correct order with some incorrect labels for seasons and no details.

Correct order with correct labels for seasons and some details.

Correct order with correct labels for seasons and many details.

Correctness of precipitation

Incorrect precipitation for more than one season.

Incorrect precipitation for one season.

Correct precipitation for all seasons and some details.

Correct precipitation for all seasons and many details.

Appropriateness of clothing

Incorrect clothing for more than one season.

Incorrect clothing for one season.

Correct clothing for all seasons and some details.

Correct clothing for all seasons and many details.

Quality of project

Poor quality.

Average quality.

Above average quality.

Excellent quality.

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 2
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.V.3.E.2.html

What Causes the Seasons? What makes this site notable is that it is one of the few science sites that tailors the explanation of the seasons according to beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels, although the latter two are often the same. The site is thus truly compatible to the needs of a K-16 audience.
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/cgi-bin/tour_def/the_universe/uts/seasons1.html

Baxter, Nicola. Autumn. SEASONS SERIES. Children’s Press, 1997.

Burke, Jennifer. Cloudy Days. WEATHER REPORT…SERIES. Children’s Press, 2000.

Gibbons, Gail. The Reasons for the Seasons. Holiday House, 1995.