Science
Strand V
Use Scientific Knowledge from the Earth and Space Sciences in Real-World Contexts

 

Science/Strand V
Content Standard 3
All students will investigate and describe what makes up weather and how it changes from day to day, from season to season, and over long periods of time; explain what causes different kinds of weather; and analyze the relationships between human activities and the atmosphere. (Atmosphere and Weather)

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3
Elementary

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary
Benchmark 3

Explain appropriate safety precautions during severe weather.

Benchmark Clarification

Appropriate safety precautions need to be taken during severe weather. Safety precautions include moving to safe locations, listening for sirens, and monitoring radio broadcasts for severe weather watches and warnings.

Students will:

  • Explain safety precautions during severe weather such as high wind chill events, high heat index, ozone alert, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and blizzards
  • Demonstrate safety precautions they should take during a high wind chill events, high heat index, ozone alert, thunderstorm, tornado, and blizzard

While tornadoes, thunderstorms, and blizzards are significant events and students need to know how to properly respond to these events. The frequency of these events, however, is less than days when the wind chill and heat index are high. Students need to know what type of precautions to take for these two events as well.

Key Concept / Real World Context / Instructional Example / Assessment Example / Resources

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Key Concept
Safety precautions:

  • safe locations
  • sirens
  • radio broadcasts
  • severe weather watch and warning. Students need to know the difference between a watch (conditions favorable) and a warning (tornado has actually been sited on the ground.

See Atmosphere (SCI.IV.1.E.1).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Real World Context
Examples of local severe weather that changes with the seasons:

  • thunderstorms
  • tornadoes
  • blizzards
  • wind chill
  • heat index

Examples of local community safety precautions:

  • weather bulletins
  • tornado sirens

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Instructional Example

Benchmark Question: What are the relationships between human activities and the atmosphere?

Focus Question: Where is a safe place in severe weather?

The teacher will direct a discussion based on the focus question. The students will research school and local community safety precautions and present their findings to the class.

Students will use art materials to create a picture of a severe weather condition and show an appropriate location for safety.

Constructing: (SCI.I.1.E.5).

Reflecting: (SCI.II.1E.2), (SCI.II.1.E.3), (SCI.II.1E.4).

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Assessment Example

Students will present their pictures to the class and will describe the safest location for their chosen weather condition and the appropriate safety precautions.

(Rubric not required.)

(Give students rubric before activity.)

Scoring Rubric

This assessment is evaluated on a pass or fail basis. The presentation will accurately describe the safest location for the chosen weather condition and the appropriate safety precautions.

 

Science/Strand V/Content Standard 3/Elementary/Benchmark 3
Resources

Webliography.
http://mtn.merit.edu/mcf/SCI.V.3.E.3.html

National Severe Storms Laboratory: access current research efforts with Radar, Satellite, Software Development, Modeling, Tornadoes, Thunderstorms, Damaging Winds, Lightning, Hail, Winter Weather, Flooding.
http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/

The Storm Encyclopedia: from the Weather Channel, this site, “can answer your questions on severe and extreme weather.”
http://www.weather.com/newscenter/

Lampton, Christopher. Blizzard. A DISASTER BOOK. Millbrook, 1994.